lazyimbecile

time . space . perception

Dongdaemun Design Plaza by Zaha Hadid Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com Dongdaemun Design Plaza by Zaha Hadid Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com Dongdaemun Design Plaza by Zaha Hadid Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com Dongdaemun Design Plaza by Zaha Hadid Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com Dongdaemun Design Plaza by Zaha Hadid Architects | Posted by CJWHO.com

cjwho:

Dongdaemun Design Plaza by Zaha Hadid Architects | via

The DDP has been designed as a cultural hub at the centre of Dongdaemun, an historic district of Seoul that is now renowned for its 24-hour shopping and cafes. DDP is a place for people of all ages; a catalyst for the instigation and exchange of ideas and for new technologies and media to be explored. The variety of public spaces within DDP include Exhibition Halls, Convention Halls, Design Museum, Lab and Archives, Children’s Education Centre, Media Centre, Seminar Rooms and Sky Lounge; enabling DDP to present the widest diversity of exhibitions and events that feed the cultural vitality of the city.

The DDP is an architectural landscape that revolves around the ancient city wall and cultural artefacts discovered during archaeological excavations preceding DDP’s construction. These historic features form the central element of DDP’s composition; linking the park, plaza and city together.

Photography: Virgile Simon Bertrand

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Doninpark, Vienna, Austria by LOVE Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com Doninpark, Vienna, Austria by LOVE Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com Doninpark, Vienna, Austria by LOVE Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com Doninpark, Vienna, Austria by LOVE Architecture | Posted by CJWHO.com

cjwho:

Doninpark, Vienna, Austria by LOVE Architecture

The Doninpark project is planned as a five-story residential, office and retail building. The shopping space is located on the ground floor, the first and second floor are designated for restaurants and office units, and the third floor and above house the residential apartments.

The project is characterized by two special design features. First, the shape of the building is directly derived from the relevant local zoning regulations. In essence, one could say that the city of Vienna designed the building, as the building’s appearance is a model of a kind of radical pragmatism (i.e. doing exactly what one is allowed to do). Second, due to the seemingly random window openings and projecting alcoves, the façade of the building defies efforts to grasp its scale. It is nearly impossible for the viewer to ascertain the true dimensions of the building, and one might say the building disguises its true size and expanse.

Photography: Jasmin Schuller

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